How to Control the Pot in Texas Hold’em

by Aug 14, 2019Poker News

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Regardless of whether you're an aggressive poker player who likes to command the table or a younger player finding a spot at the tables, controlling the pot successfully is one surefire approach to ensure success.  

Picking when to play a major pot – and when not to – will go far towards deciding your advancement.  

There are methods that can be employed to help take – and maintain – control.

The idea of pot control is basic: assault a decent pot when you have a decent hand and stick to smaller pots when your hand is weaker.  The trouble is in knowing when you have a decent hand contrasted with your opponents, as well as in deciding when all is good and well to pursue a value bet or to try to control the pot. 

Dealing with your chip stack is inseparably connected to great pot control. Obviously, there are a couple of components that oversee this, and the terrible news is that not every one of them is able to be controlled by you.  All poker hands are characterized by the flop; however, this isn't the most important thing in the world. In the most perfect terms, you can either flop a decent hand or you can’t. Both of these situations can be manipulated to keep control of the table.

This task is a lot simpler when you are “in position,” for example the first to make a move. You can cast yourself in the job of the dominating player – regardless of whether you need to build up the pot or keep it small.  You can check in anticipation that other players will take similar action, and this is definitely a useful tactic when you have a strong hand or even a marginal one. 

Your wager size while in position will assist you with managing the pot. In the event that you've flopped a decent hand, at that point take control; this will be a fabulous chance to manufacture a huge pot. Calling and trusting that your rivals will go with the same pattern will put you in a great spot, but be warned – raising pre-turn could turn the opponents away.  This goes against the principle of pot control. 

On the off chance that you're not in position after the flop, at that point at last you are depending on the actions of the other players to build a huge pot.  Yet, regardless you'll have two options – check-call, which will allow to ascertain how the turn might be played, or make a bet in hopes that your opponents call or raise as you attempt to control the pot. 

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Having the option to read your opponents’ tells and predict their next move is a vital component of pot control   If a player to the left is weak or passive, you are in a better position to value bet more often than you would against a stronger opponent.   Value betting is always a beneficial way of building up the size of the pot, but betting and raising at crucial times are imperative to keep a passive player in the game.

The turn will solidify your position, or expose the game. Foreseeing the quality of your opponents' hands is more important now than at any other time in the game, as is recognizing their potential for an amazing draw.  On the off chance that you have a solid hand at this point, it might be a good time for a showdown.

If you are sure that you have the best hand, at that point call or make a small bet – you need to be “empowering”' your opponents to hang around until the river.  A weak hand with a potential river draw means you need to think smart – don’t let your chip stack dissolve just for the chance at a long shot win.  

Similarly to how you would rather play “readable” players instead of unpredictable ones, having an appropriate poker personality is important.  Pot control is defined by properly-placed aggression, meaning that you need to be able to mix things up in order to prevent yourself from being readable and also need to not adopt any style or strategy that could be interpreted. 

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